Our trainers, on the road all over Australia

Johnathan Link

Born in 1960, Johnathan’s background is Kuku Yalinji (Father’s Mother) Mossman Gorge region, Nyamal (Father’s Father) Pilbara Region WA, Quandamooka (Mother’s Mother) Stradbroke Island.

He has 3 children (Jayde, Travis & Shaquille) – ages 28, 25, 22 and 2 grand-daughters (Shanai, Kloe) – ages 7 and 4. Johnathan has nine step-children (5 girls, 4 boys) and eleven step grand- children (9 girls, 2 boys).

Johnathan himself is the eldest of nine children (3 boys and 5 girls, one deceased at birth).

Johnathan currently lives on the Gold Coast with his partner, Margaret, mother of his 9 step children.

Johnathan was institutionalised in the early 1960’s and lived in a boys home until 1973. He then moved to Slacks Creek with his brother and lived together with his parents until 1977 until completion of his high school education.

Johnathan Link

 

Work history

Johnathan’s work history spans many years with different Government Departments, including the private sector, NGO’s and later the RFDS QLD Sector.

Whilst at RFDS, Johnathan worked with the RRMH throughout the early days of the Deadly Thinking program, aiding in the development and facilitation of our Social & Emotional Wellbeing Program with a view to contribute to the well-being of our remote Indigenous Australians.

Johnathan is passionate about and invested in the Deadly Thinking program which he has personally facilitated across our nation.

He is available by request to deliver workshops to organisations that want to help close the gap of Indigenous disparity and to communities and individuals struggling to cope with the stressors of everyday living.

Education

  • Johnathan completed high school in 1977 (Gr12)
  • Degree in Indigenous Health Studies (Mental Health) 2005
  • Diploma of Indigenous Health Studies (PHC/General Health) 2005
  • Certificate in TAE (2012) Trainer & Assessor
  • Various other Mental health qualifications (AODs/MH& SEWB)
  • Master Instructor in Aboriginal Mental Health First Aid
  • Instructor Youth Mental Health First Aid
  • Facilitator of Indigenous Risk Impact Screening (QH)
  • Facilitator of Back in Control (Drug Relapse Prevention Program)
  • Facilitator of Growth Empowerment Measure Program
  • Cross Cultural Awareness Trainer
  • Facilitator of the Cultural Practice Program (Gold Coast)

Awards

  • Qld Fire & Rescue – Auxiliary Fire – Region 5 (1994)
  • RFDS Service Award for “Dedication and Commitment in Social & Emotional Wellbeing” 2012

Margaret Saunders

Margaret identifies as a descendent of the Wiradjuri People in Central New South Wales through her father.

Margaret’s mother is non – Indigenous.

Having completed both the ‘Deadly Thinking’ program and ‘Train the Trainer’ several times over, Margaret build on her existing communication and presentation skills to become an outstanding presenter of ‘Deadly Thinking’ workshops.

An Aboriginal woman with a large family, Margaret has a huge amount of empathy and can relate to many sensitive issues. She presents confidently, in an appropriate manner, thereby achieving successful results with workshop participants.

Work history

Margaret has worked with ATSI people in both Government and Non-Government sectors for many years.

Margaret is currently a delegate for Chamber 3 of the National Congress of Australia’s First Peoples and provides support and input into national issues relating to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. Additionally, she is performing the duties of a Project Support Offices for the ATSI support and practice team at the Department of Housing and Public Works in Brisbane.

Personal attributes

Margaret works by the philosophy that developing productive relationships can be achieved by being inclusive, approachable and openly sharing knowledge.

Margaret is conscious of cultural protocols at all times. She is discreet and maintains confidentiality when discussing sensitive issues with workshop participants.

Margaret’s skills in these areas are particularly effective when interacting with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. She represents an excellent choice of Trainer to support and promote awareness and understanding of Aboriginal culture to the wider community.

Amanda Ahmat

Mandy is a proud Aboriginal Torres Strait Islander women, born in Darwin, Northern Territory. 

Her father was also born in Darwin; with family connections to Torres Strait – Badu Island. Mandy’s mum was born in Beagle Bay Mission in Western Australia and has strong connections to the Kimberley region.

Mandy completed both the ‘Deadly Thinking’ program and ‘Train the Trainer’ workshop in Port Augusta in 2014. She found it was a great opportunity to enhance and build on existing skills and knowledge in mental health.

Following the completion of her training, Mandy successfully delivered several ‘Deadly Thinking’ workshops to community members across South Australia. Mandy is also experienced in facilitating Train the Trainer events.

As a single mother to two young men aged 23 and 20 years of age, Mandy is empathetic, strong and kind. She quickly establishes a warm relationship and builds rapport with workshop participants of all ages and backgrounds.

Amanda Ahmat

Work history

Mandy has a strong work history spanning 30 years. She has worked both for Government, State and Commonwealth and Non-Government sectors.

Mandy worked in the Northern Territory for 20 years and for State Government in South Australia over the last 10 years. She has worked both in rural and remote areas of Australia, covering Central Australia and Country South Australia. Mandy has specialised in the field of Community Engagement, Community Development, Mental Health – Social Emotional Wellbeing, Community Service, and Administration.

Currently Mandy is on leave for 12 months in her home country of Darwin. She is readily available during this time to facilitate Train the Trainer and Deadly Thinking workshops.

Personal attributes

Mandy works by the philosophy that developing productive relationships can be achieved by being inclusive, empathetic and respecting others.

Mandy has built a strong foundation for her sons, ensuring they know their families and their country of importance.

Mandy is aware of the importance of cultural protocols at all times. She is discreet and maintains confidentiality when discussing sensitive issues with workshop participants.

Mandy’s skills in these areas are particularly effective when interacting with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

She represents an excellent choice of Trainer to support and promote awareness and understanding of Aboriginal culture to the wider community.

Henry